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Bounce

Director: Don Roos
Producer: Michael Besman, Steve Golin
Screenwriter: Don Roos
Stars: Ben Affleck, Gwyneth Paltrow, Natasha Henstridge, Jennifer Grey, Tony Goldwyn, Joe Morton, David Paymer
MPAA Rating: PG-13
Year of Release: 2000
Released on Video: 04/10/2001

Ad-man Buddy thinks he’s doing Greg a favor by swapping tickets with him during a long weather delay at the airport. Greg needs to get home so he can be with his son; meanwhile, Buddy has a lovely and available woman to keep him occupied while waiting for the next flight. But Greg’s plane crashes, all aboard are killed, and Buddy’s agency is charged with smoothing over the airline’s public relations fiasco. In trying to make up for his guilt, he hunts down Greg’s wife and son and tries to help them, but fails to tell them who he is. Meanwhile, he falls in love with both of them. Torn between his love and his increasing guilt, he is working up the courage to tell them who he is when they find out on their own and send him packing. After succumbing to alcoholism, loosing his job and working through rehab, he begins life with a fresh outlook.

Viewing Suggestion:

Notice how Buddy’s guilt grows and threatens to ruin his life, but is finally overcome by his humility and willingness to heal.

Ask Yourself:

- Do you believe that you cannot let go of your guilt? (By using the word “guilt” here, I am referring to “feelings of guilt” that are not based on being guilty of a serious misbehavior. You may know the difference rationally, intuitively, or after you have heard at least one well-meaning friend tell you: ”You should not feel guilty about this.”
- Do you think Buddy misperceives himself as being guilty?
- Do you remember a time in your life when you were able to let go of feelings of guilt?
- Imagine how you would feel, if you were free of this guilt now?
- If this was possible and you don’t think Buddy is guilty, do you consider that you might have the capacity to release your guilt now?
- How you would feel, if you were free of guilt?