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The Accused

Director: Jonathan Kaplan
Producers: Stanley R. Jaffe, Sherry Lansing
Screenwriter: Tom Topor
Cast: Jodie Foster, Kelly McGillis, Bernie Coulson
MPAA Rating: R
Year of Release: 1988
Released on Video: 04/16/2002

Sarah is no angel: after a fight with her boyfriend drug dealer, she goes to a bar, gets drunk and dances provocatively with a young man. But when the man tries to take it further, she attempts to stop him and is then gang raped as bystanders cheer. Wanting justice, she struggles with her low self-esteem but finally faces the brutality of a trial that judges her as much as it does the three men accused. And when they get off with light sentences, she and her female prosecutor decide to go after the bystanders as well.

Viewing Suggestion:

Watch how Sarah learns to find justice by confronting her rapists in court. She has to face many challenges until she reaches her goal. (If you have experienced traumatic abuse, check with a therapist before watching this movie.)

Ask Yourself:

- Do you believe that you are not capable of confronting or getting away from people who treated you badly?
- Do you remember a situation in your life when you faced a fear of conflict and confronted somebody who had mistreated you?
- If you find yourself in similar situations now, you might want to try it again, starting with someone who presents only a small challenge. Look for a mentor to provide you with guidance, like Sarah has.
- Does Sarah’s capacity to confront her abusers remind you of neglected resources inside you that might help you to achieve the same?